Everyone Loves Free Spaceships, Right?

I made some new spaceships for the Singularity System. Specifically, the Systems Malfunction campaign setting of the Singularity System, which some of you may know from the about-to-turn-ten-years-old LARP of the same name. I figured I’d share them here for free. I’ve written up stats for two small craft,  three capital ships, and a space station (!!) plus a new Starship Bay Weapon that starships can’t actually mount, only space stations can. These should make for a neat add-on for any Systems Malfunction game, and nearly any ongoing Singularity System game you guys might be running.

Singularity System stats are provided but you could also adapt any of these ships for Traveller, Eclipse Phase, Star Wars, or whatever really, if you were so inclined.

The Singularity System didn’t really have rules for space stations, and I’m not formally writing them here. But they are basically what you would think. Immobile objects in space can’t use the Change Range and Facing action, can’t do Evasive Maneuvers, and they can’t Disengage from star combat. They effectively don’t have a Helmsman role or an Auto-Pilot subsystem or a Bridge to shoot at. They’re also sitting ducks to long-range weapons platforms unless they mount Extreme range weapons, so they almost always do.

The formatting is going to be really wonky for this stuff because WordPress doesn’t allow tables and tables would be a pain to set up so these will just be big sloppy lists. Sorry about that, maybe Mik can clean it up into a PDF later on.

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SPLINTER’d (Kickstarter Campaign Ongoing)

Not gonna lie, I wanted to make an ETG post quick to get the taste of the last post out of my mouth. I certainly don’t regret anything I said, as such, but let me say this: having at-all controversial opinions and a crippling anxiety disorder is a really tough combination to live with. Hell, having an anxiety disorder doesn’t pair especially well with having principles, period. I’m eager to get back to discussing games I actually like, and of course that includes the ones that I invented myself.

So, SPLINTER. Our Surprising Things Kickstarter has been live for about a week now. It will be a full week tomorrow. So far we’re about 30% funded with about three weeks to go. That’s not terrible by any means but of course I’m already worried we won’t make it: see again, anxiety disorder making life more difficult than it should be.

This also has to do with the fact that this KS is very much necessarily our litmus test for the future of the SPLINTER game line going forward. If this KS funds, obviously SPLINTER has enough public interest to support in full. If it doesn’t, that would be a clear indicator that SPLINTER is just too niche and weird a project for the adventure games market. So the stakes are scary high. If you’re reading this and you haven’t backed and/or put in your 20 hours on social media pestering all your friends to back, please help me out and do so. (To those of you who’ve already given, the vast majority of you have given AMAZINGLY generously, so thank you all so, so much!)

Some exciting news, though, in the field of…actual news. I’m happy to report that our KS has been featured on the frontpages of Tabletop Gaming News (TGN) and Roleplayers Chronicle. That’s super groovy and hopefully it will bring us to a larger audience.

When we hit the 50% funding mark, I’m going to reveal some of our stretch goals which I’m pretty stoked about. This isn’t quite a preview, but it verges on one.

So the SPLINTER Core Rulebook is the very first product End Transmission Games ever published (not the first game I designed by a long shot, though, as both Phantasm and Psionics are older than it by five years or more, but that’s neither here nor there). Anyway, as our oldest product SPLINTER is obviously the one I most wish I could go back and change, since I’ve learned so much about this game design business since its release.

Mostly, this is a production values thing. Mikaela has grown by such leaps and bounds as a layout artist that the difference in visible production quality between SPLINTER (her very first layout project) and Psionics is obviously a difference of several orders of magnitude. Likewise, some of the art that we included in SPLINTER is not up to our current standards (although don’t get me wrong, some of it is just as great as anything in Psionics: I really dig black and white art in general.).

But there are also some things in SPLINTER’s rules that I’d like to change. Traditionally, this is why roleplaying games have second (and third and fourth and sixth) editions. It’s too early for a new edition of SPLINTER, though, by every conceivable metric. For one, it simply hasn’t been enough years. For another, we haven’t sold anywhere near enough copies to justify launching a new edition as any kind of sound financial decision. Finally and most importantly, we haven’t received nearly enough actual play feedback to have a truly informed perspective on the issues with the rules that would be needed to make the targeted changes for a new edition.

When it comes to the SPLINTER rules, I’m fairly happy with the rules governing gameplay in the Splinter itself (both the core dice pool mechanic and its particular interactions). But the “real world” rules for “playing your Player” Earthside use a primitive primordial ancestor of the DicePunk System that I’m not entirely proud of. I’d love to upgrade the Earthside rules to use the DicePunk System proper (at the Realistic/Literary Campaign Power Level), since it’s better than its prototypical ancestor in pretty much every way. This would have the added benefit of making our roster of supported coherent games that much more coherent. We’d be supporting DicePunk, Singularity, and Splinter which as one game with two systems would be DicePunk/other, as opposed to not-quite-DicePunk/other, which is even sloppier and more confusing. Fans of DicePunk games like Psionics could logically have their attention drawn to Splinter, and vice versa. Finally, since EarthSide stats influence Avatar stats, using the modern incarnation of the DicePunk system for Splinter’s Earthside play would improve upon that two-systems-in-one-game interaction.

A chance to overhaul the SPLINTER core rules would give me an opportunity for lots of other little tweaks too–while writing this, for instance, I noticed that many of the SP awards in the Subscriber Point Reward table on page 59 are a bit low for my tastes–but I’m not looking to make any major changes to the core “in-the-Splinter” gameplay. Except for the massive influx of new content that’s the entire point of the Surprising Things project.

So, at this point I’ve basically come around to revealing that our first stretch goal will be some kind of overhaul of the SPLINTER core rulebook. Which is an idea that really excites me, so here’s hoping.

On Censorship and Principle

The internet has made the venerable epigraph “I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it” (Evelyn Beatrice Hall, if you were wondering, but traditionally and wrongly attributed to Voltaire) seem a rather tired and worn-out bit of rhetoric. But overused or not these are words I have always tried to live by, as best as I can.

I disapprove of “Tournament of Rapists” in the strongest possible terms. It is a benighted piece of grotesque wrongheaded filth that should have never existed. I seriously question the character of the people who created it and who sought to publish it. I cannot overstate the fact that I am not a fan.

But censorship is always wrong. When a monolithic distribution channel like One Book Shelf, a self-acknowledged de-facto monopoly, bans a product, that is tantamount to censorship, and they know it. And they very nearly did so, not because it was in line with their principles, but to satisfy the demands of a screeching hate-mob of perpetually outraged social justice harpies who for some reason did not think that not buying the product and/or leaving it one star or less reviews would be enough to let the market sort itself out. This is shameful.

At DriveThruRPG, we trust publishers to upload and activate their own new releases without anyone at DriveThru reviewing the product before it goes public. Because this system worked so well for the past 14 years, we had no need to create an “offensive content guideline.” To avoid anything approaching censorship, we simply adhered to an unwritten policy of not banning any RPG product.

There is, however, a growing problem. Sometimes, RPG creators design content that goes beyond disturbing. For example, we recently — and rightly — received criticism for selling an RPG supplement called “Tournament of Rapists” for four days on our marketplace.
In hindsight, we realize that we should have suspended that product from sale immediately, pending further internal review and discussion with the publisher. For a variety of reasons, we relied on our standing policy of not banning RPG titles, even in the face of a product so offensive that the policy was inadequate. We understand that we were wrong to do so.

A New Policy

It is time to change the approach we have used on DriveThru. Our prior stance, that “censorship is unacceptable,” was tantamount to shirking our responsibility. As market leaders, we are in a position that requires us to be leaders also in keeping the RPG hobby inclusive and safe.

I have actually been hoping to try and strengthen our working relationship with DriveThru RPG in the future. And in the interest of being fair, I will acknowledge that OBS did not actually ban this product. They did ban another product, nearly a year ago, that was far less offensive by any reasonable human metric, for even more tenuous reasons, but that is neither here nor there. In this case, they spoke to the author and publisher who agreed mutually to pull the product, so that is alright. What is not alright is that DriveThru has changed its policy AWAY from a policy of “Censorship is uancceptable”. This is not a good change.

I don’t know a lot about James Raggi. He’s the designer of an RPG called Lamentations of the Flame Princess that I also don’t know much about, but that looks pretty cool and which is, while WAY BIGGER than anything End Transmission publishes, not exactly SUPER-WELL-KNOWN. Anyway, my point is, he recently said this on Google+. And while I’m not a Google+’er, I couldn’t + this enough. I don’t know what political baggage agreeing with him might entail, but I agree with what he had to say:

I checked my stats and according to the ranking function they have in the Publisher tools, I am a Top 2% seller on OBS. (which says more about how small the 98% are more than how big I am) I have done over $100,000 gross sales over the six years I’ve sold through the site, which isn’t nothing.

If one of my products gets pulled, or if the products of my peers are pulled without their consent, I am taking every LotFP product off of that site, which will be something of an economic armageddon for me and a hardship from everyone on my roster getting royalties from sales. I’ll also have pretty much no mechanism for conveniently delivering PDFs to people. (even reinstating PDF sales on my site would leave me no mechanism to provide access to people that do not purchase the title; I have rather cheap software and investing in more sophisticated software will be quite impossible without OBS sales money coming in.)

This past weekend a brainless howling mob showed they were in charge of this industry and have the power to disappear ideas and products they disapprove of. Whether this is the majority or a very vocal minority doesn’t make much difference to me; I consider myself at war with them. That this is within our industry feels like an intense betrayal; I have been literally shaking mad over the past several days. Simply shitting out pieced-together cheap crap POD versions of what I owe people and simply quitting has crossed my mind.

Without the ability to freely create, and freely reach people who might be interested in those creations, participation in this hobby and this industry is simply not worth doing.

Anyone who would restrict that creativity, or make it more difficult to find people who are creating things you might enjoy, anyone who restricts imagination and works of fiction, anyone who works to ban any work, is simply evil.


We have lost a great deal over the past several days.

While I appreciate his turn of phrase (“brainless howling mob”), I think he’s going a bit far in calling this impulse to destroy art that offends you, and the business based decision to give in to that impulse, “evil”. But it’s sure as hell not good. A lot of social justice berserkers argue that censoring this product somehow makes tabletop gaming a more inclusive, safer space for women and minorities. That is so much bullshit. Censorship rearing its ugly head in this industry makes the space of tabletop games feel that much less safe for my girlfriend, just as one example. Because fuck censorship.

We are, of course, not actually pulling our products from DriveThru, for the same reason that End Transmission games, if it were a person, would not light a stick of dynamite and then swallow it: it would be EXTREMELY. FUCKING. BAD. FOR US. I am in no position to commit principle-based financial seppuku when we are trying to support our family and we are trying to do so through our games. Above and beyond this, a repulsive shitshow like Tournament of Rapists is not the hill my company is going to die on, thank you very much.

But I do need to shake my head at DriveThru caving to this kind of pressure. Censorship is always wrong. Answer speech you find distasteful with your own speech. Not by silencing it.

Epic Battles In Spaaaaaaaaace

Epic Space Battles is a free rules add-on we’re releasing for The Singularity System designed to make space battles more epic. I mean this more literally than facetiously. The base Singularity System starship combat rules are SO DETAILED and SO INTRICATE that with more than 2-4 starships, things bog down and the lag becomes so great that the game is effectively unplayable. A six starship on six starship combat would take an unfeasibly long time to resolve, like maybe eight hours or more depending on the GM’s personal style and processing speed. This is…less than good. I’ve always pitched the Singularity System as having really fast playing and scalable starship combat, so I wanted to go back and make those things actually true, and release the patch for free.

From a game design standpoint, here’s some of what I did to convert the Singularity Core Starship Combat (SCSC) rules to the majorly simplified rules sytem I’m calling Epic Space Battles:

  • In the base rules, every starship gets at least four or five and as many as ten or more actions per turn at a minimum. One action for the helmsman, the engineering chief, and the infowar chief, plus one action for each bay weapon and each turret. But then each of these roles or stations gets additional actions later in the turn based on its ReAct value, which is based on character attributes (for manned stations) or ship system ratings (for autopiloted stations). This can quickly get a little crazy, with 20 or more actions per ship per turn being not all that anomalous. In the Epic Space Battles rules, this was the first thing to be drastically simplified: one action per ship per turn. (There are now several phases to each turn, however, so for PC crewed ships, each role still gets to do their thing.)
  • In the base rules, every starship role–or at least most starship roles–can use their actions to aid their ship in various ways. The Engineer, for instance, can boost the shields to help the ship’s defenses or boost the engines to help the helmsman perform maneuvers, the Helmsman can perform Evasive maneuvers or change range and facing relative to target ships to line up a shot, the Infowar station chief can give the Weapons bay chief more dice with a target lock or perform active jamming to keep their own ship from getting locked on to, etcetera. We wanted to retain that dynamic and that sense of teamwork and synergy but without all of the extra actions. So what I did is I added an ‘allocation’ phase where each role can allocate dice to one of four dice pools–Attack, Defense, Maneuver, and Initiative–depending on the role’s individual actions. Instead of “rolling to lock on” or “rolling to jam incoming target locks”, the Infowar Chief can now just choose to allocate their dice into Attack or Defense. Because allocating dice into dice pools individually would take too long for NPC ships, you can also just pick a preset ‘Stance’ for your ship which allocates your available roles’ dice automatically into different dice pools to focus on Attack, Defense, Maneuverability and so on. This makes things a lot faster while retaining a lot of tactical depth.
  • This already shaves a lot of time off, but I wanted it even faster, for truly epic space battles. In the base rules, a starship couldn’t be killed or crippled until you’d shot through its shields, then shot through its hull, then destroyed either its bridge or its reactor. Again, I simplified: “Shields” were abstracted into a Defense Pool bonus, and ships were simplified down to just having one pool of ‘Hit Points’, called ‘Hull’, rather than Hull Points and then Hit Points for each individual component of the ship. Some weapons had the partial ability to penerate Shields, so this was converted into an abstract Attack Pool bonus.
  • Finally, individually processes like Point Defense (shooting down incoming projectiles) and launching swarms of fighters for attack runs on enemy ships (to be intercepted by screens of enemy fighters) were heavily abstracted, moving in the latter case from handling individual vessels to handling ‘swarms’ of small craft.

So with the new rules in place, I wanted to do some playtests. I knew it was faster but I didn’t know if it was fast enough. I decided that I’d try for four playtests, doubling the number of ships each time: 4 vs 4 ships, 8 vs 8 ships, 16 vs 16 ships, and finally a clash of vast armadas, 32 ships vs 32 ships. Of course most of the conflicts would include carrier class ships carrying swarms of fighters, to make things hairier and really test the system under strain.

To make things more fun, I decided to make the playtests a game. Mikaela and I each picked a faction from the Systems Malfunction universe and spent an appropriate budget of credits to assemble and arm our fleets before pitting them against each other.

As arbitrary benchmarks, I set a target time I wanted to be able to complete each combat in. For 4 vs. 4 I decided that should easily resolve in under an hour. For 8 vs. 8, I decided 90 minutes. I thought 16 vs. 16 ships should be doable in 2.5 hours and 32 vs. 32 ships should be resolved within 3 hours, which would allow a truly epic space battle with extra time left over for an average RPG session. Like I said, these targets were selected in a pretty arbitrary fashion. One constant was that I set up the names and hull points of each ship in a notepad for tracking, and we had wet erase markets on hand for tracking relative ship positions, but I did NOT preroll the first initiative.

So how’d we do?

  1. The first playtest was easily completed within an hour, with 15 or 20 minutes to spare. I shudder to think how long a simple four starship versus four starship skirmish would take in the SCSC rules.
  2. If I recall correctly, 8 vs. 8 ships took a lot more than 90 minutes but a little less than two hours. I know that we missed the target but not by a huge margin.
  3. The 16 vs. 16 fight I was expecting to run longer than the target time based on how the 8 vs. 8 fight had gone. I wasn’t wrong. This fight was still going solidly after the 3 hour mark, though. Based on this, I decided to reduced the final trial to “only” 24 vs. 24 ships.
  4. The 32 vs. 32 24 vs. 24 fight was the finale. For this one, we decided to pit an armada from the Sol Invictus setting versus an armada from the world of Systems Malfunction. This epic battle took far longer than three hours, and I think we were somewhere between four and five hours of playtime before we thought a winner had emerged. The first initiative took a half hour to roll and set up.  One thing I noticed with this playthrough was that after the three hour mark, things felt more grueling than fun, but that probably has more to do with us not starting the playtest until 10PM than anything about the system itself. I think by that point we were just worn down physically.
  5. Our goal was to determine how long each combat would take, not which side would win or what the casualties would be. With that said, a miscellaneous observation we couldn’t help but making was that the loss of life (and ships) on both sides was, in all battles, catastrophic, a total massacre. Most fights involved so much senseless destruction on both sides of the battle that there was no clear winner. When a winner did arise, it was only the most stringently pyrrhic victory. I think this owed more to the fact that fleets built on the same amount of credits tend to be rather evenly matched, as much as the fact that the ESB system is (for the reasons discussed above) rather lethal. Mikaeala thought this was pretty sad, but I thought it was pretty neat.
  6. Due to the Advent rules, the side with the PC ship on it always fared better than the other side, and the PC ship always survived, a definitely desirable feature for obvious reasons.

Conclusions: The Epic Space Battles rules were hugely faster than the rules they’re designed to (optionally, for larger scale battles) replace, but not quite as fast as I wanted. While I found a few things I could twist and turn to speed them up by a few percent (the first rules for resolving initiative ties that I’d put were just terrible, for instance), in the end I think the times I wound up with can be deemed acceptable. 24 vs. 24 battles in most RPG systems can take quite a bit of time, and when dozens of massive starships are maneuvering in three dimensional space and allocating systems dice to different pools to fire dozens of lasers and missiles at each other, while launching dozens of fighters on attack runs to be intercepted by other fighters and…yeah. I think that the concept of “Epic Space Battles” has a pretty darn high inherent complexity as far as things to faithfully simulate in a game go, so I’m happy to have gotten the running time and complexity for huge fleet-on-fleet space combat actions down from “GM’s head literally explodes” to ” a couple hours”.

If you’re curious about the final product, it will be up on the usual suspects for free once it’s laid out, arted, and published.

I <3 GenCon

Usually I don’t manage these post-con recap posts until around Tuesday or so, after I’ve had Monday to make it home and recover, but this one seems to be burning a hole in my pocket so to speak, so I’m going to let it fire itself off now (Sunday, just sitting down after the con closing). Maybe I’ll go short now and make a more detailed recap later. Maybe.

I love GenCon. For four days a year, my social circle is suddenly four times as big as for the other 352. Everyone is excited and they’re all excited about the same stuff that excites me. People I run into know me and what I do and treat me like they care and it matters. And all around me are geeks and nerds of every imaginable stripe letting their freak flags fly, wearing their colors proudly. It is an incredible high and I am left totally physically and emotionally exhausted and with no idea how to feel now that it’s over.

We got to play a couple of fun games, although we spent most of the con running our own demos in the IGDN room. Not as much Battletech as I’d have liked to get in, and I missed out on a RIFTS game I’d had my eye on, but oh well. Ben Woerner ran his World of Dew for us (I played a ronin based on an amalgamation of the roles Toshiro Mifune is named for: not particularly imaginatively, the character was named Toshiro Mifune, and for name meaning, I facetiously wrote “Toshiro Mifune” in that spot too, then crossed it out and wrote “Japanese Clint Eastwood” which I thought was descriptive enough). I’ve actually owned World of Dew since GenCon of last year or even earlier, but I’ve never gotten to play it. The game he ran was quite nicely done (his ability to spontaneously generate samurai noir characters and places with appropriate names was impressive), but it did get me thinking about why I’m not a fan of storygames/meta-narrative currency in general, so that will probably be a blog post soon where I actually go in depth and discuss some game design philosophy/theory stuff. At midnight on Friday I finally got to play the National Security Decision Making game, specifically the fast-play doomsday clock scenario. I was randomly handed the Presidency of India, barely survived an internal coup from a slighted covert operations director who went rogue, and was minutes away from convincing my cabinet to sign off on nuking the crap out of Pakistan when they were saved by the bell, the bastards. I’ll admit I almost fell for the smooth-talking Chinese diplomat who nearly convinced me to let Chinese troops occupy the Kashmir region as a demilitarized zone. All in all it was chaotic, hectic, heated, zany, high-intensity, preposterously stressful yet almost unbelievably fun two hours. Would definitely play again.

Our six demos (24 whole hours of demos) went great overall. The IGDN rooms were a seriously happening place. By a very idiosyncratic and highly mercenary metric I personally like to use, we had an unprecedented success rate of 65% (the number of players who had fun was over 90%, but that’s not how I’m measuring success in this instance). Mikaela took the bullet on the morning demos of Splinter and Singularity for me. I ran very full games of Psionics on Thursday night and Singularity on Saturday afternoon, eight players to a table! Dan Davenport, the GMShoe, graced us with his presence for the Singularity demo, which was super fun.

The three Psionics demos we ran–Mikaela ran two of them–one on each day, were especially fun and memorable. Many players took off with really fun and interesting interpretations of the pregenerated cast, and there were some seriously unexpected twists and turns that unwound from the demo scenario, especially at Friday night’s game, which got intense. I was happy to see my pal Rusty in attendance at Saturday night’s game. All in all, I got to meet and thank a great big bunch of Psionics backers in person, along with many fans that have been supporting us for years now. You people are super and it was a blast gaming with you and hanging out. Overall, it was a really cool experience.

I’ve kind of lost interest in supplying my games to Games On Demand for them to run. This is the second or third year running that I’ve talked with their organizers about how to go about this and received exceptionally uncomfortable answers. I’m really tired of being stonewalled: there are plenty of other avenues for GMs to run my games at conventions.

We met famous (or at least semi-famous, or nerd famous, or internet famous, or whatever) people and they were nice to us. Yesterday Mik got to meet Trace Bealieu, who was really friendly and approachable, and snagged me an autograph from Margaret Weis. Periodically over the course of the con my mood was dampened by the occasional belligerent jerkass or creepy slimeball (more on the last later maybe), and even if those creepy jerks are far outnumbered by cool dudes and ladies, I’ve always been more sensitive to negative emotions and more inured to positive ones. Still, though, today was really the feather in the cap, though, a blur of awesomeness that left me feeling both dizzy and over the moon.

R.K. Milholland (!!) said kind things about the artwork in Psionics, I bought a print from Metamorphosis Alpha and Dungeon Crawl Classics artist Doug Kovacs, met and bought an autographed book from Adam Scott Glancy over at Pagan Publishing, one of the original creators of DELTA MOTHERFUCKING GREEN (holy crap you guys), talked shop and hung out briefly with Eloy LaSanta, Matt McFarland and various other folks from the IGDN, saw my books on the Studio 2 shelves among the likes of Pinnacle Entertainment (!), Mongoose Publishing (!!), and FASA (!!!!) which made me feel   like I was a ‘real’ game designer more than anything else has, and then hung out for a while with Matt Clements, Brandon Aten, and Kevin Siembieda, all of whom were amazingly friendly and approachable. I happily traded my very last copy of Psionics (!!) to KS (!!) for Palladium’s new(ish) Robotech Tactics RPG, and Kevin actually asked me to sign it as though I was anyone of any importance, or as though he hadn’t been an industry legend for a bajillion years, which is ridiculous, in the best possible way. I also bought a Rifts ballcap, a Chaos Earth mousepad, and Chi-Town Library pencils, and the probably-never-gonna-be-produced-but-anything-is-possible RIFTS Movie Script.

In closing, today I spent way, way too much money on dice, minis, Magic cards, RPGs and Battletech stuff, and I am very, very tired. Fuck yeah, GenCon.

Incoming Niftiness

Crossposty from the End Transmission blog which is to say, also me:

Three things coming up as we’re now about a week out from GenCon 2015. As usual, we will be there, running a bunch of demos and just generally getting our geek on. Please come find us and say hi! Our products including Psionics should be available at the Studio 2 booth in the dealer’s hall. For the third year running we haven’t managed to secure a booth of our own at GenCon, but not for lack of trying. Hopefully that will change going into next year. As for news from the homefront, here’s what’s up:

1) In the next few days we’ll be uploading the DicePunk SRD to the interwebs. If you did not know, DicePunk is the free, Creative Commons licensed core rules system that powers Phantasm(2010) and Psionics. (If you’re reading this, you probably already know this, but you don’t need DicePunk to use Phantasm(2010) or Psionics, or vice versa.)If you like things you can hold in your hands, the DicePunk SRD will also be on sale in a lovely book form from some of the usual suspects, and will be launching as a new product for GenCon 2015. Hardcopies will be available from the Studio 2 booth: those books are being printed now.

2) We’re about to be playtesting new large-scale starship combat rules for The Singularity System, a product we’re calling Epic Space Battles, that lets you run larger space combats with more ships faster. It’s basically a massively streamlined and more scalable version of the basic Singularity starship combat rules. This product will also be released for free (so many free things!) as a PDF here and on DriveThru. Not because we don’t think it’s awesome, but because this is something that the Singularity System promised from day 1 and if you already own the Singularity System you really should get this for free.

3) We want to meet and talk to people who want to run our games at cons and FLGS around the country. We want to give them (even more) free stuff and cool t-shirts and prestige. We want to make it official. We want, in short, an organized play program. So we’ll be reaching out in a big way. Look for news about this over the next month or so. This is something we’ve been talking about internally forever and it’s time to finally turn that talk into action.

Over and out, internets,




For the third year running, Origins was awesome and exhausting. For the third year running our sales showed slow and steady growth, too. This year, just as steady but way less slow. In fact, if you squint, for the first time ever we actually MADE SOME MONEY by going to the con. Shocking, I know. But I think we might be approaching one of them ‘tipping point things. Keep in mind you’re hearing guarded optimism from a dedicated lifelong pessimist here.

21 out of 25 copies of the limited edition Psionics Core Rulebook sold with two more hand delivered to backers. I can confess this is the fastest we’ve ever sold anything. T-Shirts, stickers, and dice were a hit too–especially the design we’ve taken to calling Comrade Octo-Stalin and anything remotely related to Pyrokinesis. It is a pleasure to burn, apparently.

We had great fun running great Psionics demos Thursday and Saturday nights–Friday was a mysterious no-show. On Friday for the first time ever two PCs played by strangers initiated and completed the act of coitus in a men’s bathroom stall during a combat sequence, if I’m not mistaken, IN INITIATIVE ORDER. So yeah. That happened. Much experience was awarded.

On Saturday, the player manning the Firestarter intentionally overloaded, instantly reducing all other PCs to ashes. I was cringing and expecting recriminations for this disaster, when two of the players whose characters had just been immolated bought the book immediately! The most pleasant surprise ever, for sure. And goes to show that there ARE some gamers out there still who share my philosophy about character death.

The sole Splinter demo was a huge success too, sad I wasn’t there to see it but Mik did a bangup job and the number of groups actually playing Splinter might have just increased by a relatively huge margin. Singularity demos were fun too, especially Thursday’s.

On Friday night Mikaela and I got to hop on a game of RIFTS being run by the folks at Amorphous Blob (a gaming club, or so I gather). I played a CS Strike ‘Borg, she played a Dog Boy, the scenario was based on Expedition To The Barrier Peaks (my favorite!) and SOME ALIENS GOT THEIR DAYS THOROUGHLY RUINED. Huzzah.

In the background, I overheard a WWII Champions/Hero System game with Marvel superheroes as the PCs and the Red Skull as the villain, and at one point I heard the GM say “well he has 10 points of Mental Defense, because he’s a Nazi” and that was pretty great, but then I heard the GM say:

Take an extra 6d6 for your Presence Attack, since you just killed Hitler.

And my life was well and truly complete. What an awesome week. Big thanks to John and Allison for helping out with the Booth, the Demos, and everything else.

I bought some stuff. Notably, I got a starship deckplan from Scrying Eye games (starship deckplans, usually from Traveller, are something I almost never get to use but am nonetheless addicted to collecting), the miniatures game Aetherium (if you know anything about the stuff I make, you understand why I had to buy this) and the short story collection Soft Apocalypses by Lucy A. Snider, because as an author who sells my stuff directly, I love to buy stuff directly from authors. I’ve read a few stories in it and I can’t recommend it strongly enough if you’re a fan of really, viciously disturbing horror. I mean, “I Fuck Your Sunshine” is the title of one ‘track’ on this ‘album’. ‘Nuff said, I think?

Now to re-enter my post-convention recuperative coma. Psionics fulfillment will be underway shortly, with the rollout of the PDF most likely leading off.