I <3 GenCon

Usually I don’t manage these post-con recap posts until around Tuesday or so, after I’ve had Monday to make it home and recover, but this one seems to be burning a hole in my pocket so to speak, so I’m going to let it fire itself off now (Sunday, just sitting down after the con closing). Maybe I’ll go short now and make a more detailed recap later. Maybe.

I love GenCon. For four days a year, my social circle is suddenly four times as big as for the other 352. Everyone is excited and they’re all excited about the same stuff that excites me. People I run into know me and what I do and treat me like they care and it matters. And all around me are geeks and nerds of every imaginable stripe letting their freak flags fly, wearing their colors proudly. It is an incredible high and I am left totally physically and emotionally exhausted and with no idea how to feel now that it’s over.

We got to play a couple of fun games, although we spent most of the con running our own demos in the IGDN room. Not as much Battletech as I’d have liked to get in, and I missed out on a RIFTS game I’d had my eye on, but oh well. Ben Woerner ran his World of Dew for us (I played a ronin based on an amalgamation of the roles Toshiro Mifune is named for: not particularly imaginatively, the character was named Toshiro Mifune, and for name meaning, I facetiously wrote “Toshiro Mifune” in that spot too, then crossed it out and wrote “Japanese Clint Eastwood” which I thought was descriptive enough). I’ve actually owned World of Dew since GenCon of last year or even earlier, but I’ve never gotten to play it. The game he ran was quite nicely done (his ability to spontaneously generate samurai noir characters and places with appropriate names was impressive), but it did get me thinking about why I’m not a fan of storygames/meta-narrative currency in general, so that will probably be a blog post soon where I actually go in depth and discuss some game design philosophy/theory stuff. At midnight on Friday I finally got to play the National Security Decision Making game, specifically the fast-play doomsday clock scenario. I was randomly handed the Presidency of India, barely survived an internal coup from a slighted covert operations director who went rogue, and was minutes away from convincing my cabinet to sign off on nuking the crap out of Pakistan when they were saved by the bell, the bastards. I’ll admit I almost fell for the smooth-talking Chinese diplomat who nearly convinced me to let Chinese troops occupy the Kashmir region as a demilitarized zone. All in all it was chaotic, hectic, heated, zany, high-intensity, preposterously stressful yet almost unbelievably fun two hours. Would definitely play again.

Our six demos (24 whole hours of demos) went great overall. The IGDN rooms were a seriously happening place. By a very idiosyncratic and highly mercenary metric I personally like to use, we had an unprecedented success rate of 65% (the number of players who had fun was over 90%, but that’s not how I’m measuring success in this instance). Mikaela took the bullet on the morning demos of Splinter and Singularity for me. I ran very full games of Psionics on Thursday night and Singularity on Saturday afternoon, eight players to a table! Dan Davenport, the GMShoe, graced us with his presence for the Singularity demo, which was super fun.

The three Psionics demos we ran–Mikaela ran two of them–one on each day, were especially fun and memorable. Many players took off with really fun and interesting interpretations of the pregenerated cast, and there were some seriously unexpected twists and turns that unwound from the demo scenario, especially at Friday night’s game, which got intense. I was happy to see my pal Rusty in attendance at Saturday night’s game. All in all, I got to meet and thank a great big bunch of Psionics backers in person, along with many fans that have been supporting us for years now. You people are super and it was a blast gaming with you and hanging out. Overall, it was a really cool experience.

I’ve kind of lost interest in supplying my games to Games On Demand for them to run. This is the second or third year running that I’ve talked with their organizers about how to go about this and received exceptionally uncomfortable answers. I’m really tired of being stonewalled: there are plenty of other avenues for GMs to run my games at conventions.

We met famous (or at least semi-famous, or nerd famous, or internet famous, or whatever) people and they were nice to us. Yesterday Mik got to meet Trace Bealieu, who was really friendly and approachable, and snagged me an autograph from Margaret Weis. Periodically over the course of the con my mood was dampened by the occasional belligerent jerkass or creepy slimeball (more on the last later maybe), and even if those creepy jerks are far outnumbered by cool dudes and ladies, I’ve always been more sensitive to negative emotions and more inured to positive ones. Still, though, today was really the feather in the cap, though, a blur of awesomeness that left me feeling both dizzy and over the moon.

R.K. Milholland (!!) said kind things about the artwork in Psionics, I bought a print from Metamorphosis Alpha and Dungeon Crawl Classics artist Doug Kovacs, met and bought an autographed book from Adam Scott Glancy over at Pagan Publishing, one of the original creators of DELTA MOTHERFUCKING GREEN (holy crap you guys), talked shop and hung out briefly with Eloy LaSanta, Matt McFarland and various other folks from the IGDN, saw my books on the Studio 2 shelves among the likes of Pinnacle Entertainment (!), Mongoose Publishing (!!), and FASA (!!!!) which made me feel   like I was a ‘real’ game designer more than anything else has, and then hung out for a while with Matt Clements, Brandon Aten, and Kevin Siembieda, all of whom were amazingly friendly and approachable. I happily traded my very last copy of Psionics (!!) to KS (!!) for Palladium’s new(ish) Robotech Tactics RPG, and Kevin actually asked me to sign it as though I was anyone of any importance, or as though he hadn’t been an industry legend for a bajillion years, which is ridiculous, in the best possible way. I also bought a Rifts ballcap, a Chaos Earth mousepad, and Chi-Town Library pencils, and the probably-never-gonna-be-produced-but-anything-is-possible RIFTS Movie Script.

In closing, today I spent way, way too much money on dice, minis, Magic cards, RPGs and Battletech stuff, and I am very, very tired. Fuck yeah, GenCon.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s